September 1, 2014
Word of the Day

torpor |ˈtôrpər|

noun

a state of physical or mental inactivity; lethargy: they veered between apathetic torpor and hysterical fanaticism.

ORIGIN late Middle English: from Latin, from torpere ‘be numb or sluggish.’

August 31, 2014

rmichaelwahlquist:

theladiestman:

zerostatereflex:

Tangible Media

MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

"Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

sex

I’ve got to admit that this is cool. I’d love to do something like this with the Laptop Orchestra (LORKAS at ASU)

August 30, 2014
Word of the Day

munificent |myo͝oˈnifəsənt, myə-|

adjective

(of a gift or sum of money) larger or more generous than is usual or necessary: a munificent gesture.

• (of a person) very generous.

DERIVATIVES

munificently adverb

ORIGIN late 16th cent.: from Latin munificent-, stem of munificentior, comparative of munificus ‘bountiful,’ from munus ‘gift.’

August 29, 2014

(Source: whathaveyoudonetomyface)

August 29, 2014
c86:

Double denim and red socks

c86:

Double denim and red socks

August 29, 2014
lawrenceleemagnuson:

Joaquin Mir y Trinxet (Spain 1873-1940)Miravet (n.d.)oil on canvas 70 x 110.5 cm

lawrenceleemagnuson:

Joaquin Mir y Trinxet (Spain 1873-1940)
Miravet (n.d.)
oil on canvas 70 x 110.5 cm

(via urgetocreate)

August 29, 2014
lawrenceleemagnuson:

Santiago Rusiñol (Spain 1861-1931) Bunyola (1908-1909)

lawrenceleemagnuson:

Santiago Rusiñol (Spain 1861-1931)
Bunyola (1908-1909)

(via jesuisperdu)

August 29, 2014
biocanvas:

Neuromuscular junctions in fruit flies
Our nerves send chemical signals to muscle fibers in order to stimulate muscle contraction, resulting in movement and locomotion. For this to happen, the ends of nerve fibers must be in very close proximity to the muscle—and we mean very close: The average space of a neuromuscular junction is just 30 nanometers, which is over 2,600-times smaller than the width of a human hair. In this neuromuscular junction of a fruit fly, nerve terminals (in red) can be seen intermingling with structural components (in green and blue). Diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy destabilize the structural integrity of neuromuscular junctions, greatly impairing muscle movement and strength.
Image by Vanessa Auld, University of British Columbia, Canada.

biocanvas:

Neuromuscular junctions in fruit flies

Our nerves send chemical signals to muscle fibers in order to stimulate muscle contraction, resulting in movement and locomotion. For this to happen, the ends of nerve fibers must be in very close proximity to the muscle—and we mean very close: The average space of a neuromuscular junction is just 30 nanometers, which is over 2,600-times smaller than the width of a human hair. In this neuromuscular junction of a fruit fly, nerve terminals (in red) can be seen intermingling with structural components (in green and blue). Diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy destabilize the structural integrity of neuromuscular junctions, greatly impairing muscle movement and strength.

Image by Vanessa Auld, University of British Columbia, Canada.

(Source: promo.gelifesciences.com)

August 28, 2014

Check out what I got! Thanks Marte for signing up to be a member and giving me this awesome tote bag. It is the first painting I ever fell in love with: Raoul Dufy’s Red Orchestra. 

August 28, 2014

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Psychedelic Jones Moth" (Thaumatographa jonesi)

…a strikingly colored species of Tortricid mot which occurs in eastern North America. Like other members of the subfamily Chlidanotinae T. jonesi is a day-flying moth and has been associated with pine forests. Thaumatographa jonesi is quite rare and as such much of its biology and ecology is not well known and host plant records are not well known. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Tortricoidea-Torticidae-Chlidanotinae-Thaumatographa-T. jonesi

Image(s): John R. Maxwell

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